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Essilor Eyezen Introduction
April 11, 2017
Eyezen lenses: relaxing eyes to help protect visual health ​Digital devices and usages are increasing the demands on our eyes. Closer and variable reading distances, smaller and more pixelate...

Eyezen lenses: relaxing eyes to help protect visual health

​Digital devices and usages are increasing the demands on our eyes. Closer and variable reading distances, smaller and more pixelated characters and longer exposure to screen glare are causing tired eyes and potentially exposing our eyes to the longer-term consequences of harmful blue-violet light. As many as three out of four people feel that they suffer from visual fatigue.   Eyezen is a new range of lenses designed for a connected life. It draws on extensive Essilor research, and includes two important technologies. The first: Eyezen Focus lens technology brings extra power optimized according to wearers’ profiles in the bottom part of the lens to support the eye’s effort in focusing at ultra-near distances that are typical of handheld devices. The second is Light Scan, a unique light filtering technology drawn from Essilor’s landmark Crizal Prevencia innovation, which protects eyes from the harmful blue-violet light emitted by digital screens.

Within the Eyezen range are different types of solution. Essilor Eyezen are new single vision lenses for permanent wear available in different design optimizations. These support eye focusing efforts according to the physiological needs of three age groups (young adults aged 20-34 years, pre-presbyopes aged 35-44 and emerging presbyopes 45-50 years). Varilux Eyezen are new multi-focal lenses for occasional wear specifically designed for the digital activities of presbyopes. They exist in three designs optimized according to type of screen most used - smartphone/tablet, computer or large screen (TV or projector).  In addition to existing personalization parameters, Varilux Eyezen lenses also offer an exclusive new personalization parameter - screen distance (vision distance to computer screen) to match individual intermediate vision needs. ​ Eyezen lenses represents the latest in Essilor technological innovation – both relaxing eyes from digital eyestrain and contribute to protecting visual health over the long-term.

Essilor®, Eyezen™, Light Scan®, Crizal® Prevencia®​  and Varilux® are trademarks of Essilor International.

Dry Eye Syndrome is characterized by itching, burning, gritty, red eyes. There are many causes for Dry Eye and, consequently there are many treatments.

Your tears serve many important functions. They wash out debris, keep your eyes moist and have special enzymes that neutralize microorganisms that colonize your eyes. Tears are made up of three layers, the lipid, aqueous and mucus layers. The lipid layer is the outer oily section, the aqueous layer is the watery middle part, and the mucus layer is the inner section closest to your cornea. The layers are produced by different glands in your eyelid and a problem with any of them can cause dry eye syndrome. If left untreated, dry eye can cause tissue damage and scarring of the cornea, leading to major vision problems.

There are many factors that can cause dry eyes. Age, certain medications, insufficient blinking, chemical composition of tears and environmental factors like sunlight, wind, dust and smoke. Dry Eye is also the number one complaint of people who wear contact lenses. With all of these potential causes there are also a variety of ways to treat dry eyes.

Artificial tears drops can help simulate tears in your eyes, reducing redness and clearing vision. Wearing sunglasses, cleaning furnace and air conditioning filters, avoiding smoke and using a humidifier can also help you reduce dryness. If you are having problems with a medication or if you wear contact lenses and are experiencing dry eyes, consult with your eye care provider to explore other options.

Because of the wide array of causes and solutions for dry eye, make sure to visit with your eye care provider to determine the best solution for you.

April is Eye Safety Month. Step #1 to ensuring the safety of your eyes is to schedule an eye exam with your optometrist.

Step #2 is making sure to wear sunglasses.

Join us April 1st for special savings on sunglass brands like:

  • BeBe
  • Vera Wang
  • Michael Kors
  • Nike
  • Oakley
  • and more!

Keep your eyes healthy this Spring.

Sincerely,

Dr. Paul, OD and Staff

In trying to answer the question of how blue light affects eye health we need to explore several topics.

Sunlight Exposure and Damage to the Eye

There have been multiple studies over the years that have shown excessive exposure to sunlight might cause damage to the eyes and the eyelids.

There is a very strong association with exposure to ultraviolet light and the incidence of skin cancer on the eyelids.

Research has demonstrated that exposure to sunlight also increases the risk of cataracts.

These studies include:

  • Chesapeake Watermen Study (Taylor et al. New Engl J Med. 1988; 391:1429-33.)
  • Beaver Dam Eye Study (Cruickshanks et al. Am J Public Health 1992; 82:1658-62)
  • Salisbury Eye Evaluation (West et al. J Am Med Assoc. 1998; 280:714-8)
  • Blue Mountains Eye Study (Mitchell et al. Ophthalmology 1997; 104:581-8).

The majority of this research implicates the UV portion of sunlight as the source of the damage, not blue light.

So where does the blue light problem come in?

Blue Light and Its Potential Effect on the Retina

Most of the evidence pointing to the potential detrimental effects of blue light has been inferred from an accumulation of several experimental studies, rather than any studies of direct correlation

A study by Han et al. (Nature 1976; 260:153-5) demonstrated that the retina of a rhesus monkey was most sensitive to shorter wavelengths of visible light with a maximum sensitivity at 441 nm, which is in the violet/blue spectrum.

Some of the studies mentioned previously that demonstrated a connection between sunlight exposure and cataracts also showed some increase in the amount of macular degeneration seen later in life in these same patients. Since UV light is almost completely absorbed by our own natural lens, the portion of sunlight that reaches the retina is the visible portion of light. Experimental evidence has shown that it is the blue/violet end of the visual spectrum that is the mostly likely cause of retinal damage.

The Beaver Dam eye study mentioned above showed that people who reported more than five hours of summer sun exposure in their early years had a higher rate of early macular degeneration. And since it appears that the blue/violet end of the visible spectrum causes the most retinal damage, it infers that blue light may be the major culprit.

Blue Light and Sleep

Blue light suppresses melatonin receptors. Suppressing these receptors helps improve “wakefulness,” so exposure to blue light during daylight hours helps keep us awake and attentive.

This same exposure to blue light in the evening may inhibit your ability to get to sleep by suppressing those same receptors.

Therefore, it might be wise to limit your exposure to screens on cell phones, tablets and E-readers in the hour or two before bedtime if you are having trouble falling asleep.

Another alternative is to wear blue-light-blocking lenses when using those devices in the evening. Wearing those same glasses in the daytime might actually decrease your attentiveness.

So What Should You Do?

Remember, the strongest evidence that light causes health problems is still the damage that can be done from the UV spectrum in sunlight. Cataracts and eyelid skin cancer are both strongly correlated with sunlight exposure. A good pair of sunglasses during daylight hours is the most important health benefit you can give yourself when it comes to protecting yourself from light damage.

As far as blue light is concerned, it might make sense to consider blue-light-filtering lenses if you are staring at light-emitting screens all day, particularly in the evening hours when exposure to blue light might throw off your sleeping patterns. The evidence that blue light exposure is a definitive risk factor for macular degeneration, especially at the levels given off by screens as opposed to sunlight, is much less clear.

So the answer is, there some evidence that there are some real possible health risks with exposure to blue light. But the degree of hype the subject is getting - especially by some specialty eyeglass makers - might be out of proportion to the degree of evidence that these effects are truly harmful at the levels to which we are currently being exposed.

 

Article contributed by Dr. Brian Wnorowski, M.D.

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After a lot of hard work with EyeMotion, our website company, we’re pleased to be launching our brand-new website.  Our goal has been to create a site that would assist you in learning about us, whether it’s finding our location or email form, reading about our wonderful eye doctors, or discovering some of our quality products and services.

Have questions about an eye issue?  We think you might also benefit from our great optometric content on eye diseases and conditions.

Our plan is to use this area to keep you informed on new offerings, sales, trunk shows, events, and so much more.  Check back here from time to time to keep updated.

We’re glad you found us, and we hope to see you soon!

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